Logo

Preparing for the Food and Nutrition Security Impacts of COVID 19 - Shared screen with speaker view
Jodi Koberinski
01:10:09
Thank you for hosting this event Jesse and the team!Jodi Koberinski here - I work on food commons in Canada and supporting Indigenous-led efforts on climate and governance beginning with #LandBack jakoberi@uwaterloo.ca to network!
Shaughn McArthur
01:10:50
Jessie Thomson:Vice President, International ProgramsCARE CanadaJessie Thomson has been working on issues related to international development and humanitarian assistance for more than 15 years. She has a Masters in International Development Studies from the London School of Economics, with a focus on conflict, humanitarian action and forced migration. With a career spanning multiple sectors, including the Canadian public service, the United Nations, the Red Cross and Red Crescent Movement and now CARE Canada, Jessie brings a unique perspective on the critical operational and policy questions facing international development and humanitarian action. She is a respected thought-leader and partnership builder, with both programming and operational experience. Jessie joined CARE Canada in 2011, focused on Humanitarian Assistance and Emergency Response. Now, as Vice-President of the Partnerships for Global Change team, Jessie is responsible for ensuring that CARE Canada is at the leading edge of innovat
Michelle Alicia Leah Ma
01:11:28
Just going to start off the chat if you don’t mind me doing I would like to start to introduce myself Bonjour Hola Hi this is Michelle from Toronto Canada from the unseated indigenous territories of the huron wendat the haudoshenokee, Mississauga, anishinabek, with the treaty of the dish with one spoon and home to many First Nations not limited Metis and inuits native-land.ca to learn about your First Nations land all over the world just wanted to introduce myself my camera is not working I am a student/advocate/program instructor/law clerk
Michelle Alicia Leah Ma
01:11:43
Tkoronto
Irene Clarke
01:13:09
Good morning to you Michelle and to all - Excited to join from Oakville, ON, Canada
Rachel Cheng
01:13:40
Hi all! Rachel from Food Secure Canada, joining from Montréal, QC
lindakulkarni
01:13:58
Hello from Smiths Falls Ontario
Jackie Wright
01:14:26
Good morning. Jackie Wright from Canadian Feed The Children based in Ottawa, ON
Vijay Cuddeford
01:14:50
Hello from Vancouver, unceded lands of the Squamish, Tseleil-Waututh, and Musqueam peoples.
Jodi Koberinski
01:15:25
265 million face starvation in 2020. Women do 76% of care work, unpaid, prior to cover-19. Spikes in gender-based violence (In Canada we’ve had 7 women and children murdered by male partners/ parents in a few weeks including a mass shooting in Nova Scotia that was based in misogyny)…. These realities are not on the minds of Canadians by and large.
Shaughn McArthur
01:17:45
Vimlendra Sharan, Director, Liaison office for North America of the Food and Agriculture Organization of the United NationsVimlendra Sharan is Director of the FAO Liaison Office for North America. Mr. Sharan brings with him more than two decades of national and international government leadership experience focusing on rural development, agriculture and food security issues. Mr Sharan has worked with the Indian Government extensively in rural and tribal areas of Maharashtra and has also been actively involved in agriculture and food policy formulation working with the Ministry of Agriculture and Farmers Welfare in New Delhi. He comes to Washington from his previous posting as Permanent Representative of India to the Rome based UN Agencies where he served as the Vice President of the Word Food Programme (WFP) Executive Board, Chairman of International Fund for Agricultural Development (IFAD) Evaluation Committee, Asia Group representative on FAO Programme Committee, and a member of the FAO Council.
kimperalta
01:17:45
Hi all! Student from University of Toronto here
Juan Echanove Echanove
01:18:07
Hi , Juan Echanove, CARE’s Senior Director for Food and Water Systems , joining from Strasbourg (France)
Wadzanai
01:19:05
Hello Wadzanai Garwe economist FAO Rome
Michelle Alicia Leah Ma
01:19:35
Hi All native-land.ca can help you find your native land if you don’t not know of this?
Michelle Alicia Leah Ma
01:19:46
It is available allover the world
antonio calzada
01:19:53
Hello to all! Antonio Calzada from Calton Consultants in Washington DC.
Jodi Koberinski
01:20:44
3% global economic shrinkage and a U shaped recovery with a wider bottom, or a W shaped curve impacted by viral waves — hitting the poorest the hardest. IN Canada that means horrendous impacts on Indigenous communities, and aggressive extractivism to generate some economic activity.
Shaughn McArthur
01:22:02
The Honourable Mike Lake, MP for Edmonton-Wetaskiwin, Conservative Shadow Minister for International DevelopmentMike is the Member of Parliament for Edmonton-Wetaskiwin, and was first elected in 2006. After his re-election in October, 2008, Mike was appointed Parliamentary Secretary to the Minister of Industry, a position to which he was re-appointed after the May 2011 election.On September 13, 2012 Mike was sworn into the Queen’s Privy Council, after being asked by Prime Minister Stephen Harper to serve on the Priorities and Planning Cabinet Sub-Committee on Government Administration. On October 21, 2019, he was re-elected to a fifth term, receiving the highest vote total out of all candidates, from all parties, across the country. He currently serves as the Shadow Minister for International Development.
Shaughn McArthur
01:22:05
Prior to entering federal politics, Mike worked for 10 years with the Edmonton Oilers Hockey Club where he served as National Accounts Manager, Director of Ticket Sales and Group Sales Manager.  Mike holds a Bachelor of Commerce (with distinction) from the University of Alberta.Mike has two children, a son Jaden, 24, and daughter Jenae, 20.  The Lakes have been active supporters of autism organizations, families and individuals across the country, and around the world, while sharing their story of life with Jaden, who has autism.
Jodi Koberinski
01:22:12
Governments failed to spot what was coming, the much longer second phase, accountability of governments world wide will be inescapable….
Michelle Alicia Leah Ma
01:23:34
amazing if interested in neurodiverse events check out viablecareers.org where we help this community to not be advocate for these youth
María M Fontecha
01:23:52
Colombia just signed a document to import food and attend COVID 19 emergency, but this is too hard to understand when our country have the land and conditions to produce our own food. Hard to understan goverment's position
Michelle Alicia Leah Ma
01:23:55
Thank you care
Michelle Alicia Leah Ma
01:24:04
for your efforts so far
Bob Tansey
01:24:33
Hi! This is Bob Tansey of The Nature Conservancy, joining from Washington, DC. I'm our global policy lead for degraded lands and restoration. A group of us visited with FAO DG Qu and other FAO colleagues in Rome over two days in February. We are looking to work with FAO and others to help foster a global movement to regenerative landscapes, focused on long-term healthy soils and nature-based solutions. Discussions like the one happening now are very helpful to inform us on addressing immediate human needs while working for longer term productivity and resilience. Thank you.
Leonides Halos-Kim
01:28:07
Hello everyone. This is Leony Halos-Kim Director for Postharvest & Agro-processing Extension of Sasakawa Africa Association (SAA) joining in from Addis Ababa, Ethiopia.
Michelle Alicia Leah Ma
01:28:20
Hi All native-land.ca can help you find your native land if you don’t not know of this?
It is available allover the world
Jodi Koberinski
01:29:31
I appreciate Mike Lake speaking his disagreement within his own party … and his commitment to work to tell stories. The story of the Muskoka Initiative is the success story of NGOs working beyond their capacities to make things happen https://policyoptions.irpp.org/magazines/february-2017/how-an-ngo-coalition-helped-score-the-muskoka-initiative/
Shaughn McArthur
01:30:17
Rene Vanderpoel, Chief of party, CARE HondurasRene is a Dutch national holding a Master´s degree in Human Geography for Developing Countries from the University of Utrecht in The Netherlands, with post graduate courses in Development Economics and Urban Planning. He has over 20 years of management experience holding leadership responsibilities at project, program and country level in the non-profit sector in Latin America and Africa. He has subsequently worked for SNV - Netherlands Development Organization, Oxfam UK and Oxfam International; is currently working for CARE International as Chief of Party of the GAC funded PROLEMPA project in Honduras.
Shaughn McArthur
01:30:19
Rene started his career at grass root level in Bolivia supporting urban squatters and their self-help housing initiatives and income generating projects, but gradually moved into project and program management covering a broad range of sectors, most specifically in the development of agricultural value chains (coffee, fresh fruit and vegetables, tourism, oils), local governance and inclusive business development.
Shaughn McArthur
01:35:14
Some speakers will have slides.
Juan Echanove Echanove
01:35:14
Many lockdowns int he Global South have been imposed in a way that made them incompatible with the right of the people to secure their livelihoods. Such situation could have been avoided. Lockdowns are a last resort, and , unfortunately, will always have negative impacts in the economy, but not necessarily to the point of making people unable to feed themselves. Food markets were closed in some countries, supply of seeds and fertilizers to smallholders were disrupted; access to farm lands by smallholders affected …While in the Global North lockdowns have been set up in a way that allow food supply and providing safetynets to the most vulnerable, that is missing in many countries int he global south. And this is happening ,at last in Africa and Asia, well before the health crisis has actually started. FAO and other global organizations should continue working with governments in the global south to help better design social distance measures that are compatible with they right for food
Shaughn McArthur
01:36:34
We'll add bios for each speaker here, in the chat, as they begin their remarks.
Rizvana Talreja
01:36:48
absolutely agree Juan. I was just in India and the lockdown there has had devastating impacts on migrant workers and daily wage earners
Shaughn McArthur
01:37:11
Please add and vote-up questions through the Q&A function.
Jodi Koberinski
01:37:58
Food shortages in local stores, communities 3-4 hours from the main road in Honduras, Rene says the food crisis will become an existential crisis. The 2019/2020 coffee had already been harvested. However, the producer needs to invest immediately following the harvest to secure the following harvest. Due to cover-19, farmers had no access to inputs. The areas Rene works in are climate breakdown susceptible. Different but connected challenges. The exporters are not wanting to risk pre-investing in harvest. — We see this in Canada with our ecological producers, whose clients refuse to contract with them and continue to buy from California. Without restaurant clients, many ecological farmers are struggling in Canada - and they are already a very small % of farmers in the country.
florenceegal
01:38:14
Experience shows that the full impact of non-food crisis on Food security and nutrition follow after several months. While immediate support to food insecure locked down households is of course essential, we also need to prepare for a second wave of hunger and food insecurity as coping strategies fail. In many parts of the world, the management of COVID19 has generated some degree of urban to rural migration. We may want to develop projects to support communities in rural areas and explore opportunities to revive local economies within an integrated urban-rural territorial approach.
Jodi Koberinski
01:39:48
We also need to consider how we take bold steps to create “public food” and food commons — how can we support cooperatives and mutual aid food systems more quickly? Is the collapsing globalization experiment better left behind and we figure out public food now?
Jodi Koberinski
01:40:33
Rene’s work lending/ giving inputs directly to women farmers is an excellent strategy …
Shaughn McArthur
01:44:03
Maximo Torero, Chief Economist and Assistant Director General for Economic and Social Development. Food and Agriculture Organization of the United NationsMaximo Torero is the chief economist and assistant director general for economic and social development at the Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations in Rome, Italy.Before joining FAO in 2019, he served at the World Bank Group in Washington, D.C. as the executive director for Argentina, Bolivia, Chile, Paraguay, Peru and Uruguay. Between 2006 – 2016, he led the Markets, Trade and Institutions Division at the International Food Policy Research Institute also in Washington. He is a professor at the University of the Pacific, Peru (on leave) and Alexander von Humboldt Fellow at the University of Bonn, Germany.
Shaughn McArthur
01:44:14
He has published more than 40 peer-reviewed academic articles analyzing poverty, inequality and behavioral economics in top journals – including in Quarterly Journal of Economics, Econometric Theory, American Economic Journal: Applied Economics, Review of Economics and Statistics and Journal of Labor Economics. Specifically, he has studied the role of infrastructure, institutions and technology on poverty reduction, and the importance of geography, infrastructure access and assets in explaining poverty. He is the author of 14 books, including Food Price Volatility and its Implications for Food Security and Policy and Innovations for Inclusive Value Chain Development: Successes and Challenges.
Shaughn McArthur
01:44:22
He has led several research programs and impact evaluations. He led the impact evaluation of the Millennium Challenge Corporation’s $450 million-investment in El Salvador’s Northern Transnational Highway and rural electrification to increase access to markets.Torero received the Chevalier de l’Ordre du Mérite Agricole from the French government for exceptional contribution to agriculture. The Global Development Network awarded him twice for outstanding research on development. His work has been cited in numerous media outlets, including CNN, BBC, The Economist and The New York Times. He has a Ph.D. in economics from University of California, Los Angeles, and a B.S. from University of the Pacific in Peru.
Bob Tansey
01:45:15
There is very valuable - even essential -- information in the chat comments in addition to the rich information from the panelists. Can the full chat history be shared afterwards? Thanks! Bob Tansey, TNC
Juan Echanove Echanove
01:47:44
A provocative thought: I tend to think that the way lockdowns have been imposed in some countries in the Global South, with little consideration to the rights of the people to secure their food, is in fact an indication of the little interest by some governing elites on the actual wellbeing of the people. Political elites in Africa and other geographies with poor health systems know that this time they would not be able skip the pandemic by flying to North America or Europe where they can get medical treatment ,so they wanted at all costs to avoid the spread of the pandemic - above ANY other consideration- thats why lockdowns in some places int eh global South are in fact much stricter than in places like Italy, Spain or France- where’re food value chain have remain operational all along the lockdown
Jodi Koberinski
01:48:28
-5% GDP growth but geographically Asian and African countries will likely be in positive growth, China recovery is slower than expected, it remains unclear. Oil prices affecting Chad, Nigeria, Libya, and cancelled cotton contracts. Not only food crisis countries are of concern…. Many countries — Brazil for example — are still in “hot spot” zones for potential food insecurity.
florenceegal
01:49:44
Jodi, we will also need to invest in rural infrastructure (storage, food processing, cool chains but also digital services) for more resilient local economies which are needed for food security and right to food.
Shaughn McArthur
01:51:51
Claude Beausejour, Director General, Global Affairs Canada, Food Systems and Environment BureauClaude Beauséjour is the Director General of Global Affairs Canada’s Food Systems and Environment Bureau.  Like anyone who is passionate about development, Claude prides himself of putting people first. This apparently simplistic approach allowed him to make a real and sustainable difference throughout his 30-year career at the former Canadian International Development Agency (CIDA) and Global Affairs Canada.  Always working with great teams and colleagues, Claude helped create genuine relationships with numerous Canadian, international and local partners while representing Canada in Chile, Peru, Nicaragua and Honduras. He likes to say that it is his style and learning from trial and error, more than his accomplishments, that earned him the Queen Elizabeth II Diamond Jubilee Medal.
Shaughn McArthur
01:51:53
Claude is originally from Témiscamingue – a remote but dynamic agriculture and forestry region in Northern Quebec, is married, has three fairly young children and a wiener dog.
florenceegal
01:52:30
Juan, in Italy, France and Spain, lock down has actually resulted in accelerating transition towards local, and preferably organic, foods, combining e-commerce and and return to proximity retailers.
Juan Echanove Echanove
01:53:22
Absolutely- I spent my confinement I France and I am Spanish- I can 100% confirm that :-)
Jodi Koberinski
01:53:24
38 degrees in Ottawa in May is a call to centre our conversations on the need for all our steps forward to be done with the climate breakdown at the centre!
Julie Truelove, WaterAid
01:54:48
In speaking of food security, rights and lockdown, I feel we need to also talk about water security and human rights to water & sanitation. I'm interested to hear from others on the role of water security in urgent issues of food security and building resilience in food systems. And of food safety/hygiene in response to COVID-19 and as good practice generally.
Jodi Koberinski
01:55:47
Loss of livelihood, higher food prices and some lower availability in some places at the centre of this food security crisis. Lack of nutritious, quality food will exacerbate the crisis’ impact on Indigenous peoples, on women and on the working poor globally…
Julie Truelove, WaterAid
01:55:51
*good practice generally for nutrition and health (i.e. handwashing guidance and so forth)
Bob Tansey
01:57:43
Very important comment by Jodi! If we as a world are to come out of the present crisis better than before it will be essential to advance climate smart agriculture. Nature-compatible solutions like rotational crops and cover crops and precision use of whatever necessary chemical additives can create healthier soils for the long term, use less of petrochemical derivatives, reduce polluting runoff, absorb carbon, and support biodiversity while making fields more resilient and productive over time. Best Bob Tansey, TNC
florenceegal
01:57:44
Juan, I am French and combined in Italy :-)
Jodi Koberinski
01:58:45
This optimistic take that the food system “has not collapsed” suggested that only a full scale crash and billions starving at once would be seen as a “failure”…. the food system is not resilient. Suggesting it is resilient is the same tired line, forgive my boldness, we’ve been hearing from Global Affairs for decades. This is not intended to undermine the good works being done within the agency and by the charity networks who deliver the programs…. If we are going to be in this moment and claim the industrialized food system is “resilient” rather than the communities of mutual care who’ve worked like hell to avoid starvation is a little misguided and will prevent the kind of responses we really need in this crucial moment.
Shaughn McArthur
01:58:49
Dr. Silvia Sarapura, Assistant Professor, school of Environmental design and Rural DevelopmentUniversity of GuelphSilvia, an interdisciplinary feminist researcher in agri-food systems, is a professor in the School of Environment Design and Rural Development in the University of Guelph. She has more than fifteen years of proven experience in the fields of feminist and gender rural planning for development, transformative change and agricultural R4D. As a result of her extensive research engagement in Africa, South East Asia, and Latin America, Silvia built a strong and innovative track record in international rural and agricultural research for development.
Shaughn McArthur
01:58:57
Currently, she has been working with the International Potato Center in the Andean Initiative and the Biodiversity-CIAT Alliance in the Seed Systems Resilience Project. She is also engaged with the initiative ‘Food Neighborhoods’ to scale up experiences of the Alliance Potato Park and 5 Indigenous communities in Cuzco in 15 countries. Until July 2019, Silvia was a Senior Researcher with the Royal Tropical Institute (KIT), Netherlands.
Shaughn McArthur
01:59:07
She worked with regional multi-stakeholder platforms for the improvement of food systems in Mozambique; applied agricultural research with CGIAR Centres and research programs and women’s organizations such as the African Women in Agricultural Research and Development. She has worked with African public and regional organizations on the Integrated Seed Sector Development (ISSD) Platform- Africa; in climate-smart agriculture and gender planning with Dutch and international organizations.As a Post-Doctoral Fellow with WorldFish, CGIAR, Silvia was part of the Global Scientific Team on Aquatic Agricultural Systems in five countries of Asia, Oceania and Africa. She also led the Gender Capacity Development and Organizational Culture Change Initiative in WorldFish. As an agronomist, she worked with the International Potato Center in farming systems and farmer-led research.
florenceegal
02:01:50
Bob, this crisis is showing just how unsustainable recent development approaches are. COVID 19 provides a unique opportunity to finally address complexity and bring together climate, nutrition, biodiversity, migration, and all other key agendas together within a sustainable territorial development approach.
Juan Echanove Echanove
02:03:29
Its true that the macro data in terms of food commodities prices , trade flows etc are not dramatically bad, but in CARE we are getting very worrisome data, from national surveys and other sources, on impacts already happening at local level, in terms of food access, production constrains and nutrition issues, specially amongst , women and other vulnerable groups. Eg 80% of women refugees in urban Jordan in Bangladesh 75% of people don’t have sufficient access to food at home;they are having trouble getting vegetables. We also have lots of qualitative information from around the Global South confirming that in many locations value chains are distorted, women have limited options for buying and selling, and families are focusing on survival over having a balance diet. :-(
Jodi Koberinski
02:04:43
Silvia recommends we make use of ecologies of change — a good source of recommendations.
Jodi Koberinski
02:05:48
SILVIA! Many thanks for your research and this presentation…
Shaughn McArthur
02:05:59
Hugo Beauregard-Langelier, Agricultural Economist and Secretary General, UPA Développement internationalHugo Beauregard-Langelier is an agricultural economist and Secretary General of UPA Développement International (UPA DI). He has over 10 years of experience in agricultural and rural development in Quebec and internationally, including Haiti and West and Central Africa. Roles that have been entrusted to him have focused on supporting peasant organizations in bringing products to market, conducting diverse training programs including those relating to agricultural and agri-food project development and management, as well as carrying out agro-ecological value chain studies.
María M Fontecha
02:06:06
Thank you Dr. Sarapura
Shaughn McArthur
02:06:41
Hugo:My presentation will revolve around three main points. I will put into perspective two realities shared by many agricultural producers both in Canada and in the global South.  I will then continue offering a strategy that governments can put forward to adapt the agri-food sector after the pandemic.At the same time, it is important to note, before getting too deep into the common realities experienced by producers here and abroad, that the COVID19 crisis has not introduced new problems in the world’s food systems – instead it has opened wide fissures that already existed in these systems.The health crisis provoked a drastic drop in solvent demand which has led to significant production surpluses and a drop in producers’ income.The delocalization of value chains and the concentration of certain links in the hands of a few large companies (eg transformation) have created bottlenecks. This does not allow the risk to be spread over several players.
Shaughn McArthur
02:06:42
Strategy: Ensure greater food autonomy via the introduction of the concept of reciprocity in commercial exchanges and trade, adjust risk management mechanisms and support family / local entrepreneurship.
Jodi Koberinski
02:11:21
This is not just about “reciprocity” in commercial exchange, but an end to the financialization, tax avoidance, and merger mania driving the current consolidation of power in the system — please see Dr. Jennifer Clapp’s research on financialization of food systems for the context.
Jeannette Tramhel
02:12:31
So many of the excellent points made during these presentations could be incorporated into a national strategy for food security as recommended in the FAO RAI Principles, No. 35 (Principles for Responsible Investing in Ag and Food Systems.)
Shaughn McArthur
02:12:49
Gisele Yasmeen:Gisèle is Executive Director of Food Secure Canada and has 20 years of leadership experience in knowledge organizations having served as a not-for-profit and federal government executive including Vice-President of Research and Partnerships at the Social Sciences and Humanities Research Council. Gisèle brings a deep food systems lens to her work and started working on agri-food issues in both Asia and Canada in the early 1990s and has published widely in the field including two books, several scholarly articles and media commentary in both English and French. She is a senior fellow at the University of British Columbia, adjunct professor at Royal Roads University and an affiliate of McGill’s Institute for Global Food Security. Gisèle has a PhD from the University of British Columbia, a master’s from McGill and a Bachelor of Arts (Honours) from University of Ottawa.
Shaughn McArthur
02:12:57
Gisèle has also advised numerous organizations including the Asia Pacific Foundation of Canada, “The Big Picnic” (a European-Union funded project on food security involving botanical gardens), the World Bank, the United Nations Food and Agriculture Organization and the Laurier Centre for Sustainable Food Systems. Gisèle is currently a member of the scientific committee of CityFood project at New York University. She has also served on five boards of directors of Canadian not-for-profit organizations, including Crossroads International.
Aviva L
02:13:22
English: https://foodsecurecanada.org/2020-growing-resilience-equity
Shaughn McArthur
02:13:23
Gisele:Good morning, my name is Gisèle Yasmeen and I’m the Executive Director of Food Secure Canada / Réseau pour une alimentation durable, normally based in Montréal. I’m calling in from beautiful Vancouver on the west coast. And at the end, I’ll close off with: Thanks very much. Our policy action plan is available in both English and French and I would be pleased to answer your questions in either language.
Aviva L
02:13:32
French: https://foodsecurecanada.org/fr/2020-accroitre-resilience-equite
florenceegal
02:13:36
People and local institutions have had to deal with the unexpected constraints they were suddenly facing. We should document ent and learn from the resulting “innovation” as this would help us understand what we may want to support or prevent.https://www.acteon-environment.eu/en/actualites/covid19-accelerating-the-move-to-sustainable-diets/
Jodi Koberinski
02:17:18
We need to have the right food to the right people at the right time = investments in local, agroecological/ regenerative approaches including processing infrastructure… 10% import replacement in such investments in Ontario alone = $250M increase in GDP.
florenceegal
02:18:34
Juan, we need local (and participatory) data in hotspot areas, national data are not useful for (or targeted towards) local planning.
Jodi Koberinski
02:18:38
Supporting Indigenous food sovereignty is the third FSC policy demand… This area requires further work and a very radical political stand on resolving the land theft at the heart of the economic and food systems disruptions…
Shaughn McArthur
02:19:16
Food Secure Canada’s Growing Resilience and Equity: A Food Policy Action Plan in the Context of Covid-19 https://foodsecurecanada.org/2020-growing-resilience-equity
Shaughn McArthur
02:19:40
Virginie Levasseur, Directrice du programme Afrique, SOCODEVI, Co-Chair Food Security Policy GroupVirginie Levasseur is the ‘directrice du programme Afrique’ at SOCODEVI. She holds a Masters of Science in Agroforestry and a Ph. D. in Tropical Agriculture. She has been involved in the field of international cooperation and tropical agriculture and agricultural extension (advisory scheme for farmers) for more than 20 years. Her professional activities, mainly carried out in West Africa and Latin America, has led her to develop an intimate knowledge of agricultural and agroforestry production systems, logic and rationality of agricultural producers when time comes to maintain or improve these production systems; sustainable watershed management; issues related to gender in agriculture, to farmers’ organizations and management of the value chain; and rural extension.
Shaughn McArthur
02:19:41
Through her career, she also developed skills related to research and development project management, in field activities project implementation, as in administrati ve management. Among her achievements, the establishment of a vegetable research and development center for West Africa, the development of various extension guides and manuals on tropical agricultural production, sustainable and integrated soil management, the elaboration of extension programs for development projects and cartography activities within the certification process, support to the development of new value chain and to existing ones (agricultural productivity, product quality and conservation, value added products, support to farmers’ organizations, support in products’ marketing), and the elaboration and implementation the M&E system for SOCODEVI. She as been on the executive committee of SOCODEVI for the past 4 years, currently being Africa program Director. Since January, she is co-chair of the Food Security and Policy Group.
Shaughn McArthur
02:20:47
Virginie - Translation:SOCODEVI’s efforts are framed within Canada’s Feminist International Assistance Policy; all our strategies and actions are designed having women’s needs (and the needs of their family) and women economic empowerment in mind;We are doing so through strengthening local cooperatives to sustainably and actively engage in local, regional and national value chains; cooperatives which in return will provide their members (women and men) with services responding to their needs;To achieve sustainability, overall climate changes challenges must be included in all agricultural, social and economic strategies;Building a strong economic sector is important around the world: it means that post-covid food security must include strengthening the economic sector: from local saving groups to small and medium enterprise, to financial institutions.SOCODEVI is not doing this alone! This is why a concerted effort is needed : Food Security and Policy Group (FSPG)
Juan Echanove Echanove
02:24:19
Florence- absolutly, we need local data , and the local data we have so far is quite worrisome
florenceegal
02:24:35
Wadzanai, I am sure you are aware of this platform? https://www.islands2030.org/virtual-platform
Jodi Koberinski
02:25:56
21 years, 27 NGO members involved in food security efforts in the Global South (and Canada). Nutrition at centre of recovery approach. Working on strengths of the various NGOs to address areas of expertise for an integrated response… crucial role for civil society organizations as they are ont he ground, have local knowledge, and networks to reach the most affected.
Shaughn McArthur
02:30:59
Find CARE's Policy Brief, "COVID19, Food & Nutrition Security, and Gender Equality" here: https://www.care.org/sites/default/files/documents/covid_food_security_and_gender_equality.pdf
Shaughn McArthur
02:32:21
Find CARE's full suite of COVID-related policy analysis here: https://care.ca/reports/
Shaughn McArthur
02:34:09
Sign up for CARE Canada's Advocacy and Events newsletter here: https://lb.benchmarkemail.com//listbuilder/signupnew?UDxLzrt9hi4QZLDcgxDKav5pwVnAjsSILR%252FMkll5Fk8Q9amXwphcsjciHg%252FVbFy1
Shaughn McArthur
02:37:25
THANK YOU all for joining. Please use sign-up form linked above to be kept in the loop as this initiative evolves.
Jodi Koberinski
02:37:28
HUGO! Making the case for Public Food and food commons…. PLEASE lets follow up on this conversation … there is an appetite for addressing this. Essential services approach. Let’s treat our farmers like doctors!
Gisèle Yasmeen
02:38:11
We have a campaign to write to your MP. Please check out on our website at foodsecurecanada.org
Benjamin
02:38:30
Thank you for putting this together
Aviva L
02:38:44
Here is Food Secure Canada’s campaign: https://foodsecurecanada.org/2020-growing-resilience-equity
Craig Johnson
02:38:55
Thank you!